Helvering v. Brunn & the Issue of Taxable Gain

Taxable Gain Income Tax Amendment

Taxable Gain

After a great deal of suspense, drama and record-breaking levels of nail-biting on the part of our readers, Huddleston Tax Weekly is proud to announce that we will be picking up our XVI Amendment series. We will contribute a few more articles to this series before we move on to other things. The purpose of our XVI Amendment series is twofold: firstly, our aim is to show how important this political act was to American society; and secondly, by examining some of the issues which were sparked by this amendment, our other goal is to provide our readers with a sense of the complexity of tax law as a field. This latter goal, if realized, should confer significant benefits to our readers: if you’re familiar with some of the essential issues in the field of tax law, the likelihood is strong that you’ll be more effective in how you handle your own tax situation.

One of the things which makes tax law such a fascinating field is that it forces you to formally analyze many terms which are casually – and often carelessly – used in everyday conversation. In common parlance, terms such as “income,” “gain” and “property” are understood intuitively and require little or no clarification. But tax law does not operate in this same way. In tax law, these terms, along with many others, have much more narrow and occasionally shifting meanings which must be carefully examined in whatever context they originally appeared in order to produce a sustainable legal result. Though they may appear simple, these terms can create all sorts of complexity in tax litigation.

The case of Helvering v. Brunn (1940) is a good example of a case which involved formal analysis of a term which is typically grasped very rapidly. The judicial officers had to determine whether the events which occurred in the case could be construed as “taxable gain.” The XVI Amendment only removed the restrictions on the taxing power of Congress, it did not contribute to the issue of what constitutes taxable gain. The case of Helvering v. Brunn explored this issue, and it added an important layer to our understanding of taxable gain. In a sense, it helped to clarify the full scope of the amendment by showing what can – and what cannot – be taxed.

Let’s look at this case more closely to get a sense of its full significance.

Facts

The respondent (a landowner) executed a lease with a tenant which provided, among other things, that any improvements or buildings added to the land during the time of the lease would be surrendered back to the respondent when the lease expired. The tenant destroyed an existing building on the land and then developed a new building in its place. The difference in value between the old building and the new one was approximately $51,434.25. The tenant forfeited the lease when he was unable to keep up with rent and taxes. Subsequently, the IRS claimed that the respondent realized a gain of $51,434.25 as a consequence of the new building which had been added to the land. The respondent disputed this claim and contended that any value conferred by the new building did not qualify as taxable gain under the prevailing construction of this term.

Law

The prevailing definition of “gross income” derived from the Revenue Act of 1932. The central question of the case was whether the value conferred by the new building should be treated as a taxable gain under the bounds established by this act.

Ruling

The court (the Supreme Court of the U.S.) ruled that the respondent had in fact realized a taxable gain when the tenant added the new building to the land. The respondent highlighted the importance of transferability (or exchangeability) to the definition of taxable gain in certain contexts. The new building was not “removable” or “separable” from the land in the sense that it could not be taken off the land and still maintain its current market value. The respondent argued that this lack of transferability made the value bestowed by the new building nontaxable. In support of this of position, the respondent cited a number of cases which apparently held that transferability was a key component of taxable gain in stock dividend transactions. The court stated that the logic underlying the importance of transferability was limited to those types of transactions and did not apply to the present situation.

The key point to gather from Helvering v. Brunn is that gain can be taxable even outside of a traditional business transaction. And the gain needn’t be transferable, at least not in most contexts. Taxable gain can be triggered whenever value has been added or an event places someone in a financially superior position. Forgiveness of a liability or exchange of property, for instance, can trigger taxable gain even though cash isn’t involved and no sale has occurred.

Image credit: ccPixs.com

Owning real estate often brings up tax issues. If you’re a current or future real estate owner and you’d like to learn about the tax perks of real estate ownership, check out our presentation on this topic by our CPA, Jessica Chisholm

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johnAbout john
Seattle CPA+John Huddleston has written extensively on tax related subjects of interest to small business owners. He is a graduate of Washington State University and the University of Washington School of Law.

Huddleston Tax CPAs of Seattle & Bellevue
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Huddleston Tax CPAs & accountants provide tax preparation, tax planning, business coaching, Quickbooks consulting, bookkeeping, payroll and business valuation services for small business. We serve Seattle, Bellevue, Redmond, Tacoma, Everett, Kent, Kirkland, Bothell, Lynnwood, Mill Creek, Shoreline, Kenmore, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Renton, Tukwila, Federal Way, Burien, Seatac, Mercer Island, West Seattle, Auburn, Snohomish and Mukilteo. We have a few meeting locations. Call to meet John Huddleston, J.D., LL.M., CPA, Tawni Berg, CPA, Jennifer Zhou, CPA, Jessica Chisholm, CPA or Chuck McClure, CPA. Member WSCPA.